Canadians would probably be one of the first to get access to 5G mobile technology in about five to seven years’ time according to Bell and Nokia.

The technology which is still being researched and tested saw its first successful trial in the country thanks to the two companies. The country’s first trials were carried out at Bell’s Wireless Innovation Centre in Mississauga wherein sustained data speeds were achieved while leveraging 73GHz spectrum for communications under 5G. According to the test results, the data speeds were 6 times faster than top 4G mobile speeds currently available in Canada.

5G technology promises much higher data speeds than the currently used 4G and this is what technology analysts around the world have been waiting for long now. Increase bandwidth requirements of mobile users across the globe for constant content access including broadcast video, Internet of Things (IoT) applications, including connected vehicles and city-wide IoT solutions are some of the things that will benefit from 5G.

With Bell being a member of the Next Generation Mobile Networks consortium – the global body defining requirements for the international 5G ecosystem – the strategic focus of the telecommunications giant is evident. Bell says that the successful trials of 5G places it in a unique position of leadership in this technology. Closely working with Nokia, Bell is playing a major role in creating 5G network that will drive the content needs of devices, applications and users across Canada and the world.

Nokia said that they are excited to have been able to demonstrate a pre-commercial 5G system with Bell, with whom they have had a long and productive history.

“Canada’s ability to compete in a digital world will be defined by our culture of innovation,” said the Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development. “This successful trial of next-generation 5G here in Canada is one example of how our country can become a global centre of innovation by being early adopters of emerging technologies.”

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