The massive popularity of Nintendo’s miniature NES Classic edition demonstrates great consumer enthusiasm all things retro gaming. Of course, if you look at the indie game dev market it is also pretty easy to see just how much people enjoy the blocky graphic style and simple game play.

These new games—even with their retro feel—might hint at nostalgia, but the mini NES Classic Edition has the games we love and the controller that, for many, was our introduction to home console video gaming. Thus, for $59.99, the Classic system comes pre-loaded with 30 Classic 8-bit NES games.

The system sold so well that you pretty much could not find it for sale before the holiday. Of course, new shipments are out and you can buy the NES Classic Edition online and in brick-and-mortar stores in the very near future.

But if you think this is the end of it, you may be excited to hear that Nintendo has, apparently, just filed a new patent for a Super Famicon controller. This intimates, then, that perhaps Nintendo is looking to capitalize on this nostalgia craze with another miniatures nostalgia system.

Now, in Japan, the NES (as we know it in America) was originally released as the Famicom. This is an eliding of “Family Computer.” Accordingly, their next system was known as the Super Famicom (in Japan), which was released in the United States as the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, or SNES.

Of course, if Nintendo were to release a mini SNES Classic Edition—in the vein of the mini NES Classic Edition—it would probably face two issues: which 30 games to include, and how quickly can they finish production?

Indeed, the 16-bit SNES also has a host of iconic games—including: Star Fox, Mario Kart, F-Zero, Zelda, and, of course, Super Mario World—so no matter what they choose, consumers will probably appreciate the selection.

In related news, Nintendo has also, apparently, filed a trademark for the GameCube game Eternal Darkness: Sanity’s Requiem, which continues Nintendo’s trend of reviving nostalgic content. And with rumors surrounding the new Nintendo Switch supporting digital GameCube games on its Virtual Console this might be just the beginning.

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