Advanced Micro Devices has gained an advantage of a couple of months over Intel in the competition to offer the fastest and the latest chip to gaming enthusiasts as well as other personal computer performance junkies. This emerged after Intel revealed on Monday that the Core i9 Extreme Edition will only become available in October. A similar chip from AMD, the Ryzen Threadripper, will on the other hand be made available to some manufacturers of personal computers before the end of July.

High demand

Despite the overall market for personal computers being in a slump that has lasted for half a decade, the high end of the market has experienced the reverse with a high demand for chips that are priced upwards of $1,000 being observed from video editors, photo editors and gamers who require high-performing desktop computers.

The speed of the graphics chip for a gaming computer matters though the main processor can assist in speeding things up for users who prefer to record and share their gaming sessions. To cater to that segment of the market, Advanced Micro Devices announced mid last month that among its new line of Ryzen chips would be Threadripper, a top-performing model. A fortnight later during the Computex show held in Taiwan, Intel disclosed that it would be unveiling an enhanced version of the i9 chip.

Core i9 Extreme Edition

While announcing the dates of shipping on Monday, Intel disclosed that some lower-end Core X lineup processors would be available beginning next week on June 26. The particular models that will be available by pre-orders include the i5-7640X processors which costs $242 and the i9-7900X which costs $1,000. Shipping of the mid-range models will begin in August. According to Intel the performance of the new chips is between 10 and 15% better compared to the previous generation.

The price of the Core i9 Extreme Edition is expected to be $2,000. Already, it has achieved a performance benchmark which was previously the preserve of supercomputers such as the teraflop. Intel was instrumental in building ASCI Red, the initial teraflop supercomputer which was unveiled two decades ago.

During the Computex show held in May, Advanced Micro Devices revealed that its Threadripper chip will possess significantly more bandwidth compared to the newest chips from Intel. This bandwidth will enable AMD chips to better connect to disk storage, graphics cards and other computer peripherals. It will take months however before the two can be pitted against each other to gauge performance.

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